Interesting facts about sneezing


Sneezing

  1. Sneezes can travel at a speed of 100 miles per hour.
  2. People don’t sneeze when they are asleep because the nerves involved in nerve reflex are also resting.
  3. Between 18 and 35% of the population sneezes when exposed to sudden bright light.
  4. Some people sneeze when plucking their eyebrows because the nerve endings in the face are irritated and then fire an impulse that reaches the nasal nerve.
  5. Donna Griffiths from Worcestershire, England sneezed for 978 days, sneezing once every minute at the beginning. This is the longest sneezing episode on record.

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What is your Blood Color??


1-Why does Blood looks blue when you see it through your skin? although it is red!!
2-Is everyone’s blood always the same color red?
You must want to know the answers!!

1-The blood always appears blue from outside in the vein under the skin. It is because of the absorption of the light of different wavelengths penetrating in your skin. The difference between capillary’s and vein’s blood color depends upon how recently blood gets oxygen.

2-Some Octupas, squids and snails= Blue Blood
Some Submarine worms= Pinkish Violet Blood
Some Skunks= Green Blood

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Zinc..a starving agent for Streptococcus pneumoniae


Zinc

New research sheds light on exactly how zinc can ‘starve’ Streptococcus pneumoniae by preventing its uptake of manganese.

Manganese is essential for S. pneumoniae to be able to invade and cause disease in humans. The researchers identified that the bacterial transporter that normally binds to manganese (PsaBCA) can also bind to zinc. However, the smaller size of zinc means that when it binds to the transporter, the mechanism closes too tightly. This causes the ‘spring-hammer’ mechanisms of PsaCA to unwind too far and jam shut, and it becomes unable to take up manganese.

Reference:

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The genome re-writting


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This is the first time ever the genetic code has been fundamentally changed. The breakthrough is a huge step forward in synthetic biology and opens up the possibility of turning re-coded bacteria into biofactories, capable of producing potent new forms of protein that could fight disease or generate sustainable materials.

Reference: http://bit.ly/19bDzvZ

Use of E.coli (bacteria) for killing pathogens


E.coli

 

E. coli is best known for making people sick, but scientists have reprogrammed it to sense and kill off slimy groups of bacteria known as biofilms, which are responsible for hard-to-treat infections that occur in the lungs, bladder and on implanted medical devices.

Reference: http://bit.ly/1g4CQ3n