Interesting facts about sneezing


Sneezing

  1. Sneezes can travel at a speed of 100 miles per hour.
  2. People don’t sneeze when they are asleep because the nerves involved in nerve reflex are also resting.
  3. Between 18 and 35% of the population sneezes when exposed to sudden bright light.
  4. Some people sneeze when plucking their eyebrows because the nerve endings in the face are irritated and then fire an impulse that reaches the nasal nerve.
  5. Donna Griffiths from Worcestershire, England sneezed for 978 days, sneezing once every minute at the beginning. This is the longest sneezing episode on record.

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Reference: http://goo.gl/HPB9gx
 

 

Suicide prevention from a blood test


suicidal behaviour

By identifying the bio-markers that show a heightened risk of suicide, doctors would be able to treat the condition, potentially saving the individual’s life. When the blood test is combined with clinical analysis of mental state, researchers were able to identify people with suicidal tendencies over 80% of the time.

It is important to note that this technique is still in the early stages and more extensive testing will be required before it can be used clinically.

Reference: www.nature.com/news/predictors-of-suicidal-behaviour-found-in-blood-1.13570

The only known fluorescent vertebrate


The proteins do not fluoresce through a chromophore like other animals. Instead, it only emits light when bound with bilirubin, which is toxic to humans in large quantities. This protein could be used to better diagnose diseases like jaundice and anemia.

A treatment for prostate cancer


microRNA

A type of microRNA has been discovered that slows down the growth of prostate cancer cells, and could be used to improve treatments against the disease. Scientists noticed that many prostate cancer cells contained less of the microRNA molecule, and went on to reveal its absence allowed them to grow rapidly.

Reference: http://bit.ly/V6QrQl

Hungry rats severly eaten newborn


Hungry rats gorge on newborns in Holy Family Hospital Pakistan. Panic spread in the labor room of the hospital with the discovery of two newborns – one dead, one alive – severely bitten by hungry rats. Nurse was shocked to see a big rat nibbling on the baby’s face, as the poor infant cried in pain. Other rats were gorging on the dead baby. Upon seeing the horrible scene, the nurse cried, prompting other staff members to rush in. The injured baby was given immediate medical aid, and the dead baby was handed over to its heirs.

Rat eaten a newborn in Pakistan

Reference:

http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2012/11/27/news/national/hungry-rats-gorge-on-newborns-in-holy-family-hospital/

Solider beetles..a source of antibacterial and anti-cancer chemicals for human


Soldier beetles are the only known animals that contain dihydromatricaria acid (DHMA), a fatty acid with antibacterial properties that helps them ward off predators and protects them against infections. For the first time, the three genes that combine to produce the substance were replicated in the lab and could now be synthesized to develop new antibacterial and anti-cancer chemicals for human consumption.

Read more: www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20120811-23844.html

Snake venom..relieving agony


The black mamba, Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis, is one of the most lethal snakes on Earth. A snakebite may bring on a world of hurt, but a substance found in black mamba venom could actually relieve pain. The finding reveals a new possible approach for pain treatment.

The compounds, called mambalgins, appear to work by blocking certain channels in nerve cells. Under acidic conditions, these channels open up, triggering pain signals. By preventing the flow of charged atoms through these channels, the mambalgins stop pain signals in their tracks.