Interesting facts about sneezing


Sneezing

  1. Sneezes can travel at a speed of 100 miles per hour.
  2. People don’t sneeze when they are asleep because the nerves involved in nerve reflex are also resting.
  3. Between 18 and 35% of the population sneezes when exposed to sudden bright light.
  4. Some people sneeze when plucking their eyebrows because the nerve endings in the face are irritated and then fire an impulse that reaches the nasal nerve.
  5. Donna Griffiths from Worcestershire, England sneezed for 978 days, sneezing once every minute at the beginning. This is the longest sneezing episode on record.

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Reference: http://goo.gl/HPB9gx
 

 

Zinc..a starving agent for Streptococcus pneumoniae


Zinc

New research sheds light on exactly how zinc can ‘starve’ Streptococcus pneumoniae by preventing its uptake of manganese.

Manganese is essential for S. pneumoniae to be able to invade and cause disease in humans. The researchers identified that the bacterial transporter that normally binds to manganese (PsaBCA) can also bind to zinc. However, the smaller size of zinc means that when it binds to the transporter, the mechanism closes too tightly. This causes the ‘spring-hammer’ mechanisms of PsaCA to unwind too far and jam shut, and it becomes unable to take up manganese.

Reference:

http://goo.gl/wyyUrY

Use of E.coli (bacteria) for killing pathogens


E.coli

 

E. coli is best known for making people sick, but scientists have reprogrammed it to sense and kill off slimy groups of bacteria known as biofilms, which are responsible for hard-to-treat infections that occur in the lungs, bladder and on implanted medical devices.

Reference: http://bit.ly/1g4CQ3n

Your DNA is flame_retardent


Italian researchers have found a new use for DNA: as a flame retardant. Coating cotton cloth with extracted DNA, the scientists found that the genetic material reduced the fabric’s flammability.

DNA coated match sticks

When heated, DNA’s phosphate-rich backbone produces phosphoric acid, which helps replace water in cotton fibers with a flame-retarding residue. At the same time, the bases, which contain nitrogen, produce ammonia, which inhibits combustion and interacts with the residue to form a protective shield over the cloth.

Reference:

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/34689/title/DNA-Is-a-Flame-Retardant/

why hands and feet get wrinkled after too much time in water?


The wrinkles that form on people’s hands and feet after soaking in water may have evolved to help humans handle wet objects more efficiently.

Pruniness on hands

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I wasn’t on wordpress for many months..just because of my study burden…
well i missed all my blogger friends …n missed your lovely posts, comments and likes too..
hope so you people didn’t forget me 😀
now i am here again…Hi to all 🙂

Wajeeha